by David D.

"The Great Spring Reading Challenge" is a program Mrs. Black made up.  Students are asked to read at home, time how long they read in minutes and record their minutes on a tracking sheet each day.  There is a graph in our classroom to track the amount of minutes students have read.  We update the graph each week.

The class chose some rewards to help us keep going.  When a student passes 100, 250, 500, 750 and 1,000 minutes of home reading, that student can choose a reward.  We have four choices for each reward level.  Examples include a piece of candy, or a privilege such as sitting in Mrs. Black's twirly chair for 50 minutes, having a friend in for lunch, sitting at a desk of your choice for 100 minutes or wearing a hat in class for a day.

Our goal is to have each student do 1,000 minutes of home reading between Easter weekend and May 31st.  If a student reads more than 1,000 minutes, that student gets a star behind his or her picture, goes back to zero, and starts up the chart again.  If the whole class does a lot of reading, we will get a class reward such as a party (for 1,000 minutes) or a movie (750 minutes).

Thank you for visiting our class BLOG.   If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

by Julia B. and Spencer B-C.

During the month of March, the Grade 5's and the Grade 6's participated in a language activity called "100 Points."  In the "100 Points" assignment students had to read a novel and then do writing and art projects depicting events that happened in the story.  We loved all the fun choices this assignment gave us!  Each project had a specific number of points (e.g. a bookmark with a picture from the book and five words that reminded us of the book was worth 10 points; an author biography was worth 40 points).  If we did the assignments correctly we would earn full points, and if we reached 100 points we earned an A+.  Here are some examples of the work students in our class did for this assignment (click on individual photos to enlarge them):

This activity was created by a teacher in Bataviia, Illinois:  http://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/100-Points-Book-Project

Thank you for visiting our class BLOG.   If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

5

Our Grade 6 study of Canada's Links to the World examined several different aspects of the topic.  The Learning Goals are shown below:

 

During this unit, Grade 6 students:

-- engaged in a "webquest" (guided search for information on the internet) about Canada's Trading Partners http://linktolearning.com/trade/partners.htm

-- read relevant sections of our Nelson Literacy text

-- watched and discussed a thought-provoking video entitled "The Story of Stuff" http://www.storyofstuff.org/movies-all/story-of-stuff/

-- analyzed posters about the life cycles of three products
http://www.epa.gov/osw/education/pdfs/life-cell.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/osw/education/pdfs/finalposter.pdf
http://www.epa.gov/osw/education/pdfs/life-soccer.pdf

-- researched and mapped the location of the raw materials needed to make these products (see map below)

-- brainstormed a list of global issues that might impact us in Canada, and researched what impacts these issues might have on our lives

Since it also tied in with the Grade 5 Science unit "Conservation of Energy and Resources," the Grade 5's also watched and discussed "The Story of Stuff" and examined the map that the Grade 6's created (shown below).

During this unit, we learned that trade between nations is much more complex than, for example, Canada buying oranges from Florida and Canada selling maple syrup to Japan. Many of the manufactured products in our homes, such as cell phones, CD/DVDs and soccer balls are made from raw materials that are harvested all over the world and shipped to factories, which are typically in China. Then the finished products are shipped halfway around the world to stores near where we live.

Through "The Story of Stuff" we also learned that many manufactured products that we purchase are thrown away within a year. So when we buy disposable products, or products with a short lifespan, we are in essence channelling energy and resources from all over the world into our local dump. This has HUGE implications, in terms of trade links, our economy, energy usage and the environment.

Here are some images of our large wall map, which illustrates the flow of materials required to bring a cell phone, CD/DVD or soccer ball into your home:

These are the products we examined.
Each was assigned its own colour of wool for our map.

Raw materials from all over the world are shipped
to factories, typically in China.

Our base map, showing the flow of materials required to make and ship to North America each of the products we examined.
At the bottom are the stages in a product's life cycle.

Thank you for visiting our class BLOG.   If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

Apologies for the lengthy period between BLOG posts.  On behalf of the students and myself, I would like to extend a HUGE thank you to Mrs. Taylor for filling in during my medical leave.  I am now back teaching full time.

 

I want to commend all the students in our class on the wonderful job they did with their speeches.  Special congratulations go out to Aidan D and Spencer C, who presented their speeches in the gym.  Spencer, a Grade 5 student in our class, won our school's Junior Speech Competition with her informative piece about the Halifax Harbour Explosion of 1917!  Spencer will now have the opportunity to share her speech in competition outside the school.  (If you would like to learn more about the Halifax explosion, go to http://www.cbc.ca/halifaxexplosion/ )

 

Last year, we introduced Learning Goals and Success Criteria to our students. Learning Goals are curriculum objectives stated in language that students can understand.  Success Criteria define what students need to do in order to demonstrate that they have met particular Learning Goals.

Success Criteria:

  • are co-authored by teachers and their students
  • ensure that students have input into their learning process
  • ensure that students understand exactly what they need to do to be successful
  • encourage students to move toward becoming independent, self-monitoring learners

We are now using Learning Goals and Success Criteria across all subject areas.  Students and teachers seem to appreciate the way in which Success Criteria take the guesswork out of learning!

Click on the thumbnail above to read the Learning Goals and Success Criteria for our Persuasive Writing project...

 

Here are some of the learning experiences in which we will be engaged over the coming weeks:

Grade 5

  • Literacy:  weekly guided reading comprehension and writing strategies sessions
  • Literacy:  Reading reflections (choice of "100 points" activities)
  • Literacy:  Persuasive writing
  • Math:  Number Sense and Numeration (solving problems involving the multiplication and division of multi-digit whole numbers, and involving the addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to hundredths)
  • Science:  Energy Conservation
  • Social Studies:  Early Civilizations
  • Phys. Ed:  Floor Hockey
  • The Arts:  Drama and Visual Arts

Grade 6

  • Literacy:  weekly EQAO reading comprehension and writing strategies sessions
  • Literacy:  Reading reflections (choice of "100 points" activities)
  • Literacy:  Persuasive writing
  • Math: weekly EQAO math strategies sessions
  • Math:  Number Sense and Numeration (solving problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers and addition and subtraction of decimal numbers to thousandths)
  • Social Studies:  Canada's Trading Partners
  • Phys. Ed.:  Floor Hockey
  • The Arts:  Drama and Visual Arts

 

Persuasive Writing:  A written work in which a writer presents a case for or against a particular position.

If you have questions or comments about any aspect of our program, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

2

Live Binders is an organizational tool for the web that allows people to create tabbed lists of links to a variety of resources.  Click on the link below to access some great Grade 5/6 curriculum-related web pages and games. Our BLOG posts are also integrated into our new Live Binders class page, so you can get all the news and info. there, instead of having to visit both sites!

Once you get to our Live Binders page, use the tabs across the top to navigate between curriculum areas, and the sub-tabs below them to access resource pages.

Here's the link (don't forget to bookmark it!):
Mrs. Black's Grade 5/6 class Live Binders page

To promote classroom and home reading, and enhance our study of particular subjects, several areas in our classroom feature book displays.

We have a Classroom Reference Library, with a display of books that rotates according to what topics we are studying.  These books are for classroom use only, and cannot be taken home.

 

 This is our main Classroom Reference Library

Along the chalkboard ledge, we have funny fiction
illustrating parts of speech and punctuation usage.

On the left side of the table, we have examples of narratives.
In writing, students are authoring their our own narratives.

On the right side of the table are First Nations texts,
relating to our Grade 6 First Nations unit.
(Grade 5's are welcome to read these books, too!)

We have some new math-related fiction and non-fiction reference texts,
available on our classroom math resource table.

Under our world map, we have a few science reference texts.
Later, we will rotate our table display to include more science resources.

We also have a Classroom Lending Library.  Most of the books in this library are Grade 5/6 novels.  Students are welcome to read them in the classroom or sign them out to read at home.

   

This is our Classroom Lending Library

Each week a student volunteer is given the job of class librarian.  That person is responsible for keeping our book collections neat and tracking books from the lending library that have been signed out and returned.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

2

by Alise

Right now, the Grade 6's in our class are studying First Nations people.  We are doing an inquiry project.  We are researching things like what different Aboriginal people ate and made, where they lived, how they travelled, and how their society was set up before the Europeans arrived.  We are going to learn so much! 

This is the project outline that the students and Mrs. Black created together:

If you click on the picture above, you can read about our project.

Mrs. Black set up a display of her books and books from the library, to help with our project.

We are also using computers to do our research.

The Grade 5's are continuing their Government unit, with Mrs. Torrey.

We will write again later to tell you about some of the things we learned...

 

Text and photos by Brandon S., Julia B. and Spencer B.  (Grade 5)

 

Over the past three weeks, the Grade 5's have been going down to the library to learn about the upcoming election, with Mrs. Torrey.

We learned about the different parties and how many seats are in the Ontario Legislative building.  We also learned about the different electoral districts and different types of governments: autocratic, democratic, oligarcic, etc.

On October 5th, we voted in the Provincial Election through the "Student Vote" organization.  "Student Vote" is a non-profit, non-partisan group working with educators to engage young Canadians in the democratic process.  Their website is located at:  http://www.studentvote.ca

These are pictures of the Student Vote Polling Station Mrs. Torrey set up in our school library:


Here are the results of our school vote:  http://studentvote.ca/ontario/results/school.php?school_id=33292385
Click on "voting info."

1

During the month of September, our class reviewed math concepts, completed the PRIME numeracy test (which identifies strengths and needs in the areas of number sense and operations) and began to move forward with our math program.

Our math program follows the Simcoe County District School Board's Course of Study.  The Course of Study summarizes key principles and learning expectations in the Ontario Mathematics Curriculum and provides a teaching sequence, timeline, and list of tools and lesson resources needed to cover the expectations.


This is a sample of the Grade 5 Course of Study Overview
and the outline for Unit 1. 

There are similar documents for Grade 6.


Resources listed in the Course of Study include "Nelson Math,"
"The Super Source Math Resource" and the Ontario Ministry of Education's
"Guides to Effective Instruction in Math, Grades 4-6."
We utilize all three of these resources in our classroom.

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Our math period begins with "bell work" from the Canadian resource Daily Math.


This resource provides practice with all five strands of math each week.

After "bell work," we engage in a three-part math lesson that includes:

  1. A "minds-on" activity that serves to review a familiar math concept or introduce a new one;
  2. A lesson and an opportunity for partner- and independent-practice;
  3. An opportunity for the class consolidate understanding by discussing new insights gleaned from the lesson.  Consolidation sometimes includes creating a note, in the form of a definition, rule or procedure that students copy into a math journal, for future reference.

At the conclusion of instruction about a concept, each student answers a math question on a piece of paper called an "exit card." Exit cards indicate how well each student understood the concept.  Students who have difficulty answering the question, or who ask for additional assistance, are offered Guided Math instruction the following day.

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Once a week, our class participates in Numeration Stations.  These math stations, or centres, are geared toward improving proficiency with math facts and mental math.  Instant recall of simple addition and subtraction equations and "times tables," and an ability to do simple math in one's head, improves a student's efficiency in solving more complex math problems.

We begin Numeration Stations with a "Times Table Challenge" quiz.

After we take up the quiz, students rotate through a variety of numeration games and activities.  During the rotation, I conduct Guided Math sessions with small groups, to ensure that each student is progressing to the best of his/her ability.

The following pictures show some of the components of Numeration Stations:


Stations include "Fraction Stories,"  Guided Math, Board and Card Games,
"Math Mysteries," and "Math Frog" (a Grade 4-6 math game website
created and hosted by the University of Waterloo).


These are some of the resources for Numeration Stations.


These are some of the 15+ math games that are stored in the green bin (above).

SOME MATH RESOURCES FOR HOME

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.

The class spent the month of September reviewing literacy concepts and skills, completing CASI reading assessments and writing "recounts."  Next week, Guided Reading will begin and students will start working more independently on literacy skills.

Our balanced literacy program includes reading, writing, oral communication and media studies.  These are some of the elements of our reading and writing programs:


Daily Language Review "bell work" provides grammar, punctuation, word usage and sentence editing practice.


Daily Five "is a structure that helps students develop the daily habits of reading, writing, and working independently that will lead to a lifetime of literacy independence."  Students engage in three twenty-minute activity rotations, within a morning literacy block, and are provided with choice regarding the order in which they complete various tasks.

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These are the cornerstones of Daily Five:

Read to Self:  The best way for a student to become a better reader is to practice each day, with books the student chooses at his/her
just-right reading level.

Read to Someone:  Reading to someone provides more time to practice strategies, helping students work on fluency and expression, check for understanding, hear their own voice, and share in the learning community.

Spelling - Word Work:   Correct spelling allows for more fluent writing, thus speeding up the ability to write and get thinking down on paper.  This is an essential foundation for writers.  Every two weeks, students are provided with five words to explore (e.g. homonyms or words from our Science and Social Studies curriculum) and choose five other words from their personal reading and writing.

Work on Writing:  Just like reading, the best way for students to become better writers is to practice writing each day.  During Daily Five, students have an opportunity to work on "Writer's Workshop" assignments, Nelson Literacy reading reflections or journal entries.

Listen to Reading:  When students hear examples of good literature and fluent reading, they learn more words, thus expanding their vocabulary and becoming better readers.  In our classroom, "listen to reading" involves the teacher or a student reading a section of a chapter book aloud to the class.

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 Each student in our class receives regular Guided Reading instruction, in a small group setting.  Our Guided Reading resource is the Nelson Literacy Kit, which includes reading folders that connect to Science, Social Studies, Health and Character Education.  Pictured above are samples of Grade 5 (top) and Grade 6 (bottom) Guided Reading folders. 


We also utilize Nelson Literacy student books, which contain Shared and Independent Reading selections and reading reflection prompts.  We use these books to enrich our studies of various subjects.  The Grade 5 books are shown on the top row and the Grade 6 books on the bottom.


Writer's Workshop
includes the study and practice of various forms of writing.  These include:  narratives, recounts, procedures, discussions, explanations, reports, and persuasive letters.  Proofreading and editing of a student's own work, providing feedback on classmates' writng and goal setting toward becoming better writers are also focal points within our writing program.  This year, students at our school are creating writing portfolios in binders provided by the school board for this purpose.

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Oral and Media Literacy comprise the the other two strands in our balanced literacy programIn future BLOG posts, student-reporters will provide updates about our learning in these, and other, subject areas.

My next BLOG post will feature the elements of our Numeracy (Math) program.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to e-mail me:  mblack@mail1.scdsb.on.ca or to add a comment to this page.